Belousiha River Lodge

 

 

 

 

 

 

The River Belousiha begins its journey from a lake high in the russian arctic tundra. The flow is permanent year round, and always crystal clear, even when carrying high volumes of snow melt in early June. It is this snow melt that signals the beginning of another Belousiha salmon season. The new fish, fresh from the Barent's sea, enter the river in either the first or second week of June. It is a bit of a gamble, and the reason for the heavy discount on the first weeks fishing. However, should the salmon not be there (although always there are kelts returning to the sea after a winter under the ice this week) there is an excellent run of sea trout at this time, and brown trout and big Grayling are also suddenly happy to rise to the dry fly, as the insect life begins to emerge from a harsh tundra winter. 

The first fish are big. Up to the meter fish with the majority over 75cm. And these run for two weeks until suddenly, grilse appear amongst them. Then the balance changes, with big numbers of grilse complimenting smaller numbers of large fish. These bigger fish head for the lake at the top of the system, where they spend the summer, being joined daily by more, before heading back into the river to spawn in late Autumn. This sets the river up for great catches, further enhanced by the arrival of big numbers of Pacific pink salmon in July. And in late July, large seatrout appear also. 

For numbers and sizes, the Belousiha peaks in late August / early September. Very few silver fish at this time, but the mature fish now re-enter the river from the lake, and the coloured up grilse are at peak numbers also. The pinks have mostly spawned and died at this point, but another run of big numbers of sea trout occurs, and the biggest of the grayling devour dry flies readily, aware of the winter fast approaching. Seasons are short and fast in the tundra.

The Belousiha is actually a tributary of the mighty Voroniya, which then enters the Barents sea. For the 2017 season, the camp have now taken a lease on the Voroniya, which brings this big, Kola type river to the rods of the guests of the Belousiha river lodge. This river was described in test fishing in 2016 as "The biggest concentration of big salmon seen in thirty years of visiting the Kola peninsular". It is affected by electricity demand, as the water flows are now all controlled by a hydro electric power plant at the head of the river, but when fishing is viable, it is also amazing. Anglers will be captivated by huge salmon showing themselves regularly, as they head to the pools below the hydro where they have adapted to spawn. Exciting times. The river is a complete contrast to the gentle Belousiha, where single handed trout gear will happily take fish, even in inexperienced hands. The Voroniya is a full on spey river, where experience see's the best results. If you have a fifteen foot spey rod that rarely see's the light of day in your tackle shed, this is the river for you.

Prices are for : Transfers, Murmansk to the camp, and the return transfer. Three meals a day (excellent gastronomy). Shower, Sauna, Guiding (although gratuities to the guides are deeply welcomed ) and fishing licences for a full six days fishing, transfers from the camp to the river Voroniya. Addtional charges are made for rental of fishing gear (very high end tackle) and alcoholic beverages.

Air fares to and from Murmansk. Visa costs.

Prices are based on 8 people sharing the camp. Individuals welcome, although accommodation is likely to be shared with another angler. All prices are in Euros.

09.06 - 16.06  1500

16.06 - 23.06   2500

23.06 - 30.06   3000

30.06 - 07.07   3000

07.07 - 14.07   SOLD

14.07 - 21.07   3000 (3 rods remaining)

21.07 - 28.07   2500

28.07 - 04.08   2500

04.08 - 11.08   2500

11.08 - 18.08   2500

18.08 - 25.08   2500

25.08 - 01.09   2000

01.09 - 08.09   2000

08.09 - 15.09   2000

To Book, or for further details or questions about visa applications email Robin@fishyrob.co.uk

The rivers

Whats included

Whats not included

PRICES - 2017